Creation Technologies Gains Fourth AS9100 Certified Manufacturing Facility

Electronics designer & manufacturer illustrates commitment to contract manufacturing of Defense and Aerospace products.

Creation Technologies, a leading electronics manufacturing services provider today announced that its electronics manufacturing facility in Vancouver, B.C. Canada has obtained AS9100 Certification.  The news comes on the heels of the company’s recent certifications of their manufacturing facilities in San Jose, California, Dallas, Texas and Mississauga, Ontario.

“We are extremely proud of this accomplishment,” said Mark Krzyczkowski, VP and General Manager.  “The AS9100 certification is the standard to which aerospace and defense suppliers are measured.  This accomplishment is proof of our continuous improvement efforts and assurances made by our team to deliver the highest quality standards and a continued commitment to manufacturing excellence.”

The aerospace and defense industry is highly regulated and demands the highest level of quality standards for the development and manufacture of products.  This AS9100 Quality Management System (QMS) standard is widely adopted to promote continuous product and process improvement in the aerospace and defense industry.

“This is another milestone in our effort to serve those market segments that we feel are integral to the growth of our business,” said Joe Garcia, Vice President of Business Development.  “This achievement is a testament to the hard work and effort that has gone into building a world class quality system and something which we take great pride in obtaining.  We look forward to continued growth of our current and potential new customers in the Military, Defense and Security markets.

About Creation Technologies

Creation Technologies is an Electronics Manufacturing Services (EMS) provider focused on building premier customer relationships with companies in the Instrumentation & Industrial, Medical, Wireless & Communications, Security & Environment, Defense, Multimedia & Computers and Transportation markets.

Creation provides start-to-finish manufacturing and supply chain solutions—from design and new product development to final integration, product distribution and after-market services—to its customers across North America and worldwide.

Creation’s financial strength, employee ownership philosophy and commitment to ongoing investment in its technical capabilities have created a highly stable partner for original equipment manufacturers.

The company of approximately 3,000 people operates 10 Manufacturing Facilities, 2 Design Centers and 2 Rapid Prototyping Centers with locations in British Columbia, California, Colorado, Texas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ontario, Mexico and China.

The Key to Longevity in the EMS Industry is Consistency

In sports they call it the “three-peat”.

It is a term when a team wins three consecutive championships. The New York Yankees, Chicago Bulls and Los Angeles Lakers are some of the elite teams that have accomplished this feat. Currently were watching to see if Team Canada can pull off their third consecutive gold medal at the world hockey championships.

Recently, Creation Technologies won the ‘Highest Overall Customer Rating’ in Circuits Assembly’s Service Excellence Awards for the third year in a row!

This award is based solely on feedback directly from OEM customers to electronics industry analyst, Circuits Assembly, and is an incredible achievement.

Creation ranks first overall amongst all EMS providers in the $500M+ category across all 5 categories of:

  • Responsiveness
  • Value for Price
  • Dependability
  • Quality
  • Technology

And while we are far from being compared to a sports dynasty, it demonstrates that we are achieving what we strive every day to deliver: consistent service to our customers.

Consistency is one of the key reasons why we have been successful for over 25 years. Our customers know our value offering and recognize that we put their needs first.

Being dependable is an art that comes with experience. These are some of the ways that we have been able to maintain consistency with our partners.

 

Our People

I get to be part of the best team in the world.

I am certain that a lot of CEOs say this, but I truly mean it. Creation is the most customer-focused company I have ever been a part of.

We have over 3,000 talented people, who have expertise, drive and heart. Every day in every business unit, they work together to solve problems, overcome challenges, and get things done.

This is a trait that cannot be taught. We choose people who have that innate desire to serve our customers and embrace our company’s core values.

 

Our Responsiveness

The hallmark of our customer service model is our ability to react.

The needs of our customers have always dictated how our business operates. With our various experts and multiple years of experience, we are able to take a customer’s problem and quickly find an efficient and effective solution.

One of the main differentiators we have over our competition is our customer-focused team (CFT) model. For every customer, we have a dedicated team that ensures projects are completed on time and at the highest quality. When customers have questions, we make it a priority to find them answers in a timely manner.

 

Our Quality

At the end of the day, you won’t last very long with your customers or this industry for that matter if you don’t consistently build quality products.

To optimize performance and eliminate product failures, we leverage our engineering expertise, invest in best-in-class machines, and design a cost-effective test stand solution.

Delivering quality products is also achieved through being proactive. Our team identifies software or hardware issues early on in the process, so that products work properly in the field.

Winning our third Service Excellence Award in a row is proof of our Continuous Improvement efforts, and the amazing collaboration between so many people – our Creation team, our customers’ teams, and our suppliers’ teams – to deliver “service excellence” to our customers that clearly differentiates Creation in the EMS industry.

So cheers to another great year as we attempt to complete a “four peat”.

3 Questions Medical Device OEMs (Should) Have for New Contract Design and Manufacturing Partners

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Today, it’s more common than ever for medical device OEMs to outsource significant portions of their design and manufacturing. The medical industry’s many regulations make this process especially complex.

As Director of Regulatory & Quality for Creation Design Services, I’m often asked about our capabilities across the product life cycle from design through after-market support. Here are a few questions I hear often.

 

1. Do You Have Proven Medical Experience?

The bottom line is, medical device OEMs want a partner with experience – especially regulatory experience.

Off the bat, they are probably going to ask about our FDA-registered product portfolio. They want to see that we have experience working with other companies in the industry.  Much of this information is actually public knowledge that can be found on the FDA website.

Medical OEMs are also looking for regulatory expertise that spans the entire product lifecycle – a partner that can take a drawing on a napkin and see it through to manufacturing transfer, all while meeting FDA requirements. That positions them for a successful 510K or PMA submission experience.

 

 2. Can You Provide Manufacturing AND Design Services?

Creation’s customers today want a full turnkey solution. They are looking for support from the minute they walk in the door with an idea, through the shipment of their first manufacturing pallet, to sustaining engineering at a product’s end-of-life.

Why?

  • Flexibility

A design partner offers medical device OEMs an immediate, expert way to supplement their product development teams.

This could mean adding capacity in existing areas to meet time and cost targets.  This could also mean adding functional expertise in product development, test fixture design, test engineering, component obsolescence redesign, value engineering, etc.

  • No Nasty Regulatory or Quality Surprises

Experienced design engineers who understand the regulatory documentation and submission process help make the transition into manufacturing seamless.

Experienced manufacturing teams who understand the regulatory requirements in a volume production environment help keep auditors and end customers satisfied and safe.

When both the design and manufacturing teams are working cohesively and have a standardized process, any issues can be easily and proactively identified, communicated and solved.

  •  Saving Time and Money

An integrated design and manufacturing team streamlines the New Product Introduction process and ensures consistency from cradle to grave.  From accelerated speed-to-market to higher-quality products, this saves medical OEMs both time and money.

 

3. Can You Support My Product Once in the Field?

Attention to a product shouldn’t end when the device leaves the manufacturing floor. Every medical OEM should target EMS providers that offer after-market services like firmware upgrades, repairs, routine calibration and service.

After all in the medical industry, an OEM can’t tell their customer, “Just put it in a box and send it back to us.”

From a regulatory standpoint, the product needs to go back through a formal process. All modifications must be documented in the DHR – Device History Record – and the provider must be able to provide a detailed record of those changes that are traceable, by serial number, back to that device.

After-market and end-of-life support processes must also take health and safety into account. For example, repair or calibration procedures may need to include decontamination or similar elimination of risk – both to the provider’s employees as well as to the ultimate end user.

At the end of the day, medical device OEMs can trust their outsourcing only to an experienced EMS provider that understands the product life cycle requirements of this highly regulated environment. Questions like these help companies qualify new outsourcing partners. 

Lucky for me that in my role at Creation, I get to say ‘Yes’ to all three.

 

To learn more about Creation Technologies, be sure to attend Getting More Bang for Your Buck: Innovating within Cost Constraints” , at BIOMEDevice in Boston, MA on April 14, 2016.

 

Creation Technologies Achieves Milestone Company-Wide ISO 13485 Medical Device Certification

Medical equipment in the ICU ward in hospital

In the medical device industry, the reliability of a product is critical for patient safety. If a device has design flaws, missing due diligence documentation, or perceived gaps in compliance, an OEM’s credibility and ability to deliver a high-quality and safe product on deadline comes into question in the marketplace.

At Creation, we understand the importance of our customers’ brand equity. Every day, I get to see the commitment our manufacturing teams have to delivering high-quality products on time. Maybe more importantly in my role as a Director of Quality and Regulatory, I also see how we analyze and provide evidentiary documentation to meet and exceed the compliance standards required in the highly-regulated medical device industry.

I’m very proud that Creation Technologies has achieved our strategic milestone to provide third-party validation of our high-reliability and quality inherent to successful medical device manufacturing and design. Today, I’m excited to say that all Creation global manufacturing and design locations now have ISO 13485 Certification.

The ISO 13485 Certification is an internationally recognized quality standard for medical devices and diagnostics. With this thorough and effective quality management system in place company-wide, I know that our customers can continue to count on us to commercialize their innovative products that have the utmost consideration for long-term patient safety and sustainability in the marketplace.

Read the full press release here: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2016/02/prweb13208185.htm

3 Areas for Improvement in the Medical Device Industry in 2016

smart medical doctor hand drawing network with operating room as concept

These are exciting times to work in healthcare. With advancements in research and innovation, the medical device industry continues to push the envelope, saving lives and improving the quality of living for people across the globe.

But even with all of the game-changing products that have been recently introduced such as LifeWatch’s Mobile Cardiac Telemetry (MCT) patch, or Medtronic’s new superDimension lung navigation software, there are still many barriers and process inefficiencies that are detrimental to innovation.

As Director of Regulatory & Quality for Creation Design Services, I see both the technical and business challenges of taking new medical products to market every day. As we begin the new year, I’d like to share my view of three ways we can do better.

 

1. Address the High Cost of Regulatory Requirements

Whether we’re talking about medical devices, pharmaceuticals, or veterinary medicine, medical companies are constantly challenged to keep up with the never-ending changes to regulatory requirements. As a quality and regulatory professional, I am constantly thinking about these changes and their impact.

For example, there are costs associated with allocating resources and time to understand any new legislation and standards.

There are costs associated with acquiring new certifications themselves, not to mention all of the preparation, due diligence and training that must come first.

There are costs associated with providing ongoing training for your people.

Depending on the number and type of products produced, and the number of people you employ, these costs are not trivial and can run into the millions.

And passing these costs onto the consumer, or worse, the costs of non-compliance, may take you right out of competition.

How would costs of compliance be altered if softcopy standards were public domain? Or if “eLearning” were entirely non-profit?

 

2. Reduce Lengthy Delays in FDA Premarket Notification / Premarket Approval

There are substantial delays in the process of marketing a medical product in the United States from FDA submission to approval. A device with a predicate, for instance, can take 180 days for the FDA to grant clearance to market. Class 3 devices requiring premarket approval can take even longer.

These delays can result in loss of potential revenue, leading to increased unit costs because of amortization.

And what about the loss of potential benefit to society?

Because of these costs and delays, some innovative products never get to market.  Both startups and Fortune 500s alike elect not to pursue some concepts because of this barrier to market entry.

What would happen if the FDA hired more submission reviewers?  Or if the FDA addressed existing internal administrative hurdles?

 

3. Simplify Complex and Fragmented Global Legislation

There are many quality and regulatory legislative requirements around the globe. Some of these are region-specific.  Some are industry- or product-specific.

As much as the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) advocates a homogeneous approach to regulatory requirements, this harmonization is not yet a reality.

For example, the FDA 21CFR820 regulation versus the ISO 13485 standard. These two requirements are very similar, however will most likely never merge. For those wishing to market in Japan on the other hand, the requirements of the Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Law (PMDL) must be independently met.

Comprehending, executing and sustaining the in-depth requirements of multiple standards is a constant burden.

If a globally harmonized standard existed, how else could these time and resources be spent?

 

Looking Forward in 2016

In conclusion, can the industry be more Lean, while still maintaining public safety and integrity?

How can we apply the Theory of Constraints to the industry as a whole?

Without a doubt, the medical device industry matures each year and while I look forward to the advancements in 2016, there is always room for improvement. Imagine if companies did not have to worry so much about barriers, but rather, focus more time into innovation and collaboration. The possibilities could be limitless.

What are your biggest Medical design and manufacturing headaches?  Drop by
our Booth #571 at MD&M West in Anaheim, CA on February 9-11

 

 

Smart Manufacturing for Smart Lighting Systems

Smart LED Lighting Systems require Smart Manufacturing Solutions
Smart LED Lighting Systems require Smart Manufacturing Solutions

Besides generating bigger electric bills, wasted lighting energy also takes an environmental toll.

Lighting  rivals that of light-duty vehicles for global energy consumption
Lighting rivals that of light-duty vehicles for global energy consumption. Source: Earth Policy Institute: http://www.earth-policy.org/data_highlights/2011/highlights15

Did you know? Lighting consumption has accounted for almost 20% of the world’s electricity demand.

Even more surprising: Lighting rivals the global automobile fleet in carbon emissions.

Modern, efficient fluorescent and LED lighting systems and technologies help dramatically to reduce waste and improve experience.

And thanks to M2M devices and IT automation, Creation Technologies’ OEM customers are now developing smart lighting systems that leverage the Internet of Things.

These forward-thinking lighting companies are changing everything.

 

Smart Lighting Systems

At their most fundamental, smart lighting systems use data to make automatic, real-time adjustments.

Light and motion sensors measure when and how a space is being used, and automated controls adjust light levels to match environmental conditions.

When daylight floods a room, for example, smart lighting can react and dim artificial light to maintain the same light level and reduce energy consumption.

Even better than their reactive capabilities, these same systems can also use predictive analytics to anticipate needs.

In our example room, smart lighting will recognize that there are greater odds of more artificial light being required when the room is occupied after sunset than at noon, and plan accordingly.

Smart Manufacturing for Lighting Systems

All contemporary lighting systems require particular manufacturing considerations and capabilities. Some examples:

  1. Materials Management:

    As semiconductors, LEDs come off the fab with a range of operating characteristics. (This is one reason why early LED products didn’t initially live up to their advertised life spans).

    Binning, or the testing, characterizing and classifying of each LED according to its individual performance characteristics, helps LED lighting OEMs and their outsourcing partners remedy this problem.

    To manage the complexity of LED binning; however, a manufacturer of LED lighting systems like Creation must have rigorous systems for procurement, incoming inspection and materials handling.

    The business systems used by the manufacturer must also provide detailed component and production traceability.

  2. Quality System Management & Regulatory Expertise:

    Lighting OEMs require an exacting level of quality for their high-performance products. (Imagine the disastrous consequences of significant roadway lighting failures).

    Their manufacturing partners building their lighting systems need quality management expertise that demonstrates compliance with whichever standards a product demands.

    These could include IPC-610 Class II, UL certification, or environmental regulations like RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances).

    One of Creation’s lighting systems customers in our Mexicali business unit, for example, measures us against the automotive PPAP (Production Part Approval Process) standard to ensure their products have industry-leading lifespans and performance ratings.

  3. Communications and Instrumentation Expertise:

    As smart lighting systems evolve and become more complex, Lighting OEMs will need to draw on the expertise of their outsourcing partners.

    Given the degree with which these lighting systems will need to leverage device-to-device communications and advanced controllers and diagnostics, the OEMs who choose a design and manufacturing partner that has the in-house expertise in these fields would be…

    Dare I say it…

    Smart.

We’d love to tell you more about what we’re doing at Creation Technologies to make manufacturing lighting systems more than just a shot in the dark! (I couldn’t resist). Contact us anytime.

10 Things You Need to Know about Manufacturing FDA-Approved Medical Devices

Manufacturing FDA-Approved Medical Devices
There are many critical elements to quality manufacturing of FDA-Approved medical devices

The purpose of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to safeguard the health of the American public through the regulation of certain products, including medical devices and food-processing equipment. Health Canada has a similar mandate.

The FDA and Health Canada have full federal authority to ban and recall any products deemed dangerous.

They can also suspend or revoke registration or licensing of an establishment, effectively shutting down manufacturing facilities. Investigations can lead as far as criminal prosecution.

As outlined in a Business Case for Quality at a recent Pharmaceutical Quality System Conference, there are many costs of non-compliance, including:

  • Direct costs (e.g. scrapped materials, production time)
  • Remediation costs (issue identification, correction and reporting)
  • Regulatory action costs (legal, logistical)
  • Market share costs (lost opportunities)
  • Reputational costs (loss of goodwill)

According to FDA regulations, “the finished device manufacturer”, or the OEM, “bears overall responsibility for the safety and effectiveness of the finished device and must control all contractors under 21 CFR 820.”

It’s obvious that a government-issued, publicly visible ‘stop-production’ order can be catastrophic to a customer base, a brand, and a bottom-line.

So how do OEMs evaluate their processes and supply chains when commercializing a new medical device?

And how can OEMs looking for a manufacturing partner for a medical device assess whether the EMS provider is compliant with the Quality System Requirements and Current Good Manufacturing Practices critical to passing an FDA audit?

We can offer some tips based on our own experience manufacturing FDA-approved medical devices and other products in highly regulated industries.

 

3 Things You Need to Know about
Manufacturing FDA-Approved Medical Devices

    1. A Gap Analysis Will Protect Your Investment

      Knowing the right way forward begins with understanding your current state.

      A Gap Analysis will require you to have an intimate understanding of the regulation and identify where you have procedural inadequacies.

      A good manufacturing partner will ultimately help you address some of these gaps.

        • Go through each step of the regulation.

       

        • Identify and size up the gaps in your documentation system first, then look at the implementation gaps.

       

      • Find an expert resource for advice, don’t reinvent the wheel. Consultants and other resources are available to help you address a particularly weak area.

 

    1. Get Your Team On Board

      Similar to many practices that stem from technical initiatives, it’s not enough if it’s only the management team that understands the implications of the regulations. We can’t stress this enough!

      Everyone with their hands on FDA-approved product needs to understand the consequences of deviating from procedure.

      For example, a production associate may not realize the full significance of a Line Clearance Procedure…until a process deviation results in product mix-up, which results in a product recall. Or maybe until two similar labels get confused, which results in a patient receiving incorrect care.

      Waiting until the “until” is not acceptable!

        • Roll out comprehensive communications programs to connect the product with the end customer.

       

      • Ensure everyone involved in building FDA-approved medical devices understands the impact of their work!

 

Good team communications and documentation are essential elements
Good team communications and documentation are essential elements
  1. Build a Robust Training Program and Keep Complete Training Records

    There’s perhaps nothing more critical than traceability to the process of manufacturing regulated products like medical devices.

    Because of product significance and legal liability, a document trail is essential.

    More importantly, should an adverse event take place, visibility of the processes and parties involved can help save lives.

      • Ensure that you have properly defined which documents constitute your Device Master Record (DMR) and Design History File (DHF) to avoid iteration.
        (Hint: if you aren’t familiar with the DMR and DHR, go back to your Gap Analysis. Alternatively, contact our Creation Design Services team who can walk you through the development process).
      • Construct a solid system for conducting and controlling training that accounts for all people that touch your product as it’s being manufactured.

     

    • Once training is completed, make sure that your training records are well-defined and available for review by an auditor or other party.

    If you need additional resources in constructing your training program, today there are many good courses available. We recommend AAMI (Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation) for a variety of programs that are taught by experienced regulatory professionals and endorsed by the FDA.

Manufacturing top-quality medical devices takes a great deal of preparation, expertise and commitment. At Creation, we know that the investment is worth it.

We are very proud to partner with medical device OEMs who do so much to employ technology to improve the lives of people around the world.

Our first blog post dedicated to this important theme outlines the first three things you should consider when deciding how to manufacture your FDA-approved medical devices. Stay tuned for the next installment!

New SMT Line in Creation—Chicago!

New SMT Line in Creation Chicago
Some of the team listening carefully as training takes places for our brand new SMT line in Creation Technologies–Chicago

What are some of the best Christmas gifts you’ve ever received? When you look back, is there one you knew right away that you’d remember for years afterward?

A Great Christmas Present

This is my first blog post for Creation, and it’s an exciting one for me.

I’ve been with Creation since 2003, and I think one thing that keeps our Customer Satisfaction so high is that we work with our customers to understand their needs as their business and industry requirements change. A key part of this is investing in our technological capabilities.

So this past Christmas, on December 31st, the team at Creation—Chicago received what we like to think is a very memorable present: a new, state of the art, SMT placement machine.

The unit replaces our existing chip shooter-based SMT placement machine line, which dated back to the late 1990’s and was well-used and well-loved.

Our new love, however, has several significant advantages for Creation—Chicago and our customers.

More Flexibility

With this new equipment, we’re able to use the same SMT feeders and programming tools across all three of our SMT lines, meaning faster changeover and better throughput.

Because of this common machine interface, we’re bringing the new machine online quickly so that we can take full advantage of our expanded capabilities.

Now, we can react more rapidly as our customers’ needs change because we can better level-load our production and schedule products at SMT swiftly and efficiently.

New Technology

We can offer our customers increased functionality because the new SMT machine also has many technological advances:

  • Placement of smaller parts (down to 01005 chips!)
  • Stacked BGA capability – package on package (PoP)
  • Combined laser and look-up camera parts centering
  • Mechanical gripper support for connectors and high-force insertion capability
  • Enhanced offline and online NPI tools
  • Increased SMT feeder and tray capacity
  • Larger PCBs (up to 21.8” x 22”)
  • 50,000 component/hour IPC placement rate for the three-machine array

Along with these advantages, the new line is less than half the footprint of our old machine. This opens up additional floor space within our facility that we can optimize for lean manufacturing.

The new machine is already operational and should be integrated with our other two lines within the next month.

As an engineer I’m excited that we’re able to support new technology.

As a businessman I’m excited that we’re ready for more growth.

And as a partner to our customers, I’m excited that we’re able to increase our reaction times and scheduling flexibility.

We’re looking forward to the rest of 2014!

Upgraded Conformal Coating Capabilities in Creation–Milwaukee

Expert Conformal Coating
With expert Conformal Coating design and application comes increased reliability and longevity

Demand is growing for electronic devices that can be used in harsh or hygienic environments.

Conformal coating–when it’s designed and applied correctly–is one way to improve reliability and lifespan for products in these conditions. It can help protect electronics against chemicals, dust, shock, stress and other hazards.

Over the last decade, we’ve seen methods for applying conformal coating improve significantly.

  • Overall, equipment is now highly configurable, offering greater system flexibility for varying customer requirements.
  • Selective conformal coating systems and inverters now offer sophisticated, automated solutions that greatly increase efficiency and quality in the production process.
  • Inline heating ovens ensure optimum performance of coatings through accelerated curing.

At Creation’s Milwaukee manufacturing facility, we have multiple customers whose products require various conformal coating applications. We also see more projects and potential projects in the pipeline that will require this technology.

So we’re very excited about Creation – Milwaukee’s new Precision Valve & Automation selective conformal coating line!

Designed for high levels of accuracy and repeatability, our new equipment arrived and we began installing it in December.

We are now in the process of converting programs, and are looking forward to the benefits that this new conformal coating line will bring to Creation and our customers.

PVA Selective Coating Automated Dispensing System
PVA Selective Coating Automated Dispensing System

 

Excellent Quality

This selective coating system enables us to produce high-quality assemblies at a more rapid rate.

With its precision dispensing, the PVA650 Selective Coating / Automated Dispensing System is incredibly accurate (to 25 microns!), and eliminates the need for most masking and protecting of certain components.

It has four-axis motion featuring optical encoder feedback on all axes, designed for the high-density and high-complexity assemblies that Creation specializes in manufacturing.

Multiple dispensing applications or materials can also be treated in one cell.

 

 

 

Increased Efficiency

The integrated PVA BI2000 Board Inverter Module gives us the ability to conformal coat both sides of an assembly without sending it through the process twice. It also enables us to work bi-directionally depending on the coating requirements.

Improved Performance

The PVA IR2000 offers custom heat profiling using infrared panels to efficiently cure adhesives and coatings in a controlled, heated environment.

If you have questions about our new capabilities, or would like more information about the best way to incorporate conformal coating into your product design or layout, don’t hesitate to send me an email.

Have you experienced challenges with conformal coating in the past? How did you solve them?

Success & The Transformation of MedTech

Changes to the MedTech Industry and Importance of Quality
Changes to the MedTech Industry and Importance of Quality

Transformation of MedTech

No matter your political opinion of the changes underway in the MedTech industry, one thing is clear: just as it already has, change is gonna come.

Many industry analysts point to new business models, increased innovation and a more holistic view of the medical ecosystem as the way forward.

In truth, isn’t that just good business?

After all, who wants to invest in, work for, partner with, or buy from, a company that doesn’t include empathy and advocacy for its end customers as a key driver of its value proposition?

We figure our customers are already doing some pretty amazing things for the business communities they serve.

In the case of our Medical customers, it’s possible that they’re already a step ahead of their competition given that it’s quite clear that they view these ‘business communities’ at their most elemental…the individuals whose lives are ultimately enriched and bettered. We’re proud to have partners like this.

It’s also clear that our Medical customers are strategists and innovators, always looking for new ways forward. It only follows that, in order to keep offering the best services to our customers and their end customers, EMS providers like Creation also need to keep pushing the envelope.

For our Medical partners, we believe this means offering solutions specifically focused on reducing R&D costs and time-to-market:

  • Expert full-product design and integrated manufacturing specifically for Medical Devices
  • Lean practices and leadership
  • Ready access to real-time data through a customer portal
  • Premium quality and technical expertise

 

Having FDA-registered business units, our most recent in our manufacturing locations in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Lexington, Kentucky, for example, is one of the ways Creation is enabling our customers to move forward quickly and confidently.

As the MedTech industry continues to evolve, perhaps one of the most important characteristics an EMS provider can have is a customer-focused approach that mirrors the customer-focused approach that drives the Medical industry.

For Creation, this means taking an interest in, and having an understanding of, the industry drivers that help our customers anticipate requirements and capitalize on opportunity.

So, what drives your own value proposition?

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